Archive for the freedom Category

Colorado is Pissed: Part Five

Posted in Colorado, Firearms, freedom with tags , , , , , , on July 20, 2013 by blackshepherd

Three different but inter-related stories are going on. Colorado is still pissed off:

Today is the one-year anniversary of the mass shooting in Aurora, Colorado. As has become usual in the case of tragedy, the vultures are circling. The Michael Bloomberg sponsored “No More Names,” tour is in Aurora reading names of those killed in “gun violence,” during the last year. Unfortunately for them, their list includes the names of one of the Boston bombing suspects and other criminals legitimately killed by both police and citizens in self-defense situations. The anti-gun rally is expected to garner “dozens,” of supporters. So, at least 24 people. Gun Rights Across America and Rocky Mountain Gun Owners are holding a counter protest.

The fifty-five Colorado sheriffs who filed a lawsuit against Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, concerning recently passed gun laws, are continuing their lawsuit. However, on the 10th of July a federal judge declined to grant a preliminary injunction against the portions of the law concerning magazines that are “readily converted,” to hold more than 15 rounds. The law as originally written would have made any magazine with a removable base plate, virtually all magazines, illegal.

Using a savvy political move, the Governor avoided the injunction by directing the State’s Attorney General, John Suthers, to issue clarifying “technical guidance” concerning the laws. The guidance included a much more restrictive interpretation of what “readily converted,” means. Regulations were also clarified for grandfathered magazines that hold more than 15 rounds. Originally, loaning the magazines was only permissible as long as the borrower stayed within “continuous physical presence” of the owner. Under the new guidance that is no longer necessary.

Both sides of the debate are claiming victory. The Sheriffs by celebrating the favorable clarification of restrictions. The anti-gun legislators by touting the lack of injunction against their laws as tacit approval. Personally I believe that both the Sheriffs and the people of Colorado would have been better served by an injunction against these immoral laws. However, the Sheriffs are continuing their lawsuit in federal court by challenging the constitutionality of these laws.

Links: Colorado Sheriff’s position paper

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_23644017/colorado-gun-lawsuit-both-sides-claim-first-round

http://kajx.org/post/updated-sheriffs-lawsuit-overturn-colorados-new-gun-laws-heads-court

In better news, the Governor set Sept. 10 as the date for the state’s first-ever legislative recall election after a judge rejected a lawsuit aimed at stopping the recalls of two anti-gun state legislators, Senate President John Morse and State Senator Angela Giron. Denver District Court Chief Justice Robert Hyatt ruled that the recall may proceed.  He stated that the right of citizens to recall officeholders outweighed the technical objections to the petitions brought by the constituents and lawyers of Morse and Giron. The recall election is going to attract an inordinate amount of out of state attention and money. Things are going to stay interesting in Colorado.

Colorado is Pissed: Part Three

Posted in Colorado, Firearms, freedom with tags , , , , , on June 25, 2013 by blackshepherd

Yesterday, 24 June 13, the Colorado Secretary of State certified that there are enough valid petition signatures to recall State Senator Angela Giron of Pueblo. The recall effort originally submitted 13,466 signatures. Following review by the Secretary of State’s office, 12,648 signatures were certified, exceeding the required number of 11,285.

Pueblo Freedom and Rights, the recall organization, is a grassroots organization headed by brothers Victor and Adam Head, both of whom are plumbers and union members. The organization did not use any paid petitioners. Instead, they relied on local volunteers who are furious that their representatives ignored the will of the electorate in order to advance a personal anti-gun agenda. Citizens feel that legislators are ignoring the people and are overstepping their bounds. Hence the recall.

In accordance with Colorado law, any eligible elector can file a protest with the Secretary of State within fifteen days in order to challenge the validity of the petition. Following the fifteen day time period, barring a successful protest, the Governor must set a recall election date within thirty days. I absolutely expect a legal protest to the Giron recall.(Update: A protest was filed to the recall petition shortly after certification of the requisite number of signatures. The protest is almost identical to the one filed in the Morse recall and also hinges on the language used in the petition. The protest was filed by a voter from the district, S. Douglas McMillan. A date for the hearing before the Secretary of State has yet to be set.)

A protest has already been filed in the Morse recall. Moments after the Secretary of State’s office validated the necessary 10,137 signatures necessary for the recall, Morse supporter Catherine Kleinsmith submitted a legal protest to nullify all of the signatures. The crux of the legal argument is that the language on the petition did not specifically demand the election of a successor for Morse. The protest argues that omission of that language invalidates every petition signature submitted to the state. The protest will be heard by the Secretary of State, Scott Gessler, on June 27 at a public hearing in Denver. The decision from that hearing could be challenged in the Denver District Court and possibly appealed to the Colorado Supreme Court.

Thus far two candidates have filed paperwork with the Secretary of State’s office stating their intentions to run in the recall election. Republicans Jaxine Bubis and William Herpin must gather 1,000 signatures from voters within the district in order to have their names added to the recall ballot. In the coming weeks several more candidates are expected to announce that they will compete for the seat. If challenges to the petitions are unsuccessful, it seems likely that both the Morse and Giron recall elections will take place in late August or September. The recall elections should make Colorado pretty interesting for a while. We’ll see what happens.

D-Day

Posted in freedom with tags , , , on June 6, 2013 by blackshepherd

Today is the 69th anniversary of the D-day invasion. On June 6, 1944, over 160,000 allied troops assaulted the beaches of Normandy. Over 9,000 of those men were killed or wounded during the invasion.

If you can ever make the trip to Normandy, you must. Standing on Omaha beach, facing inland, is terrifying. Looking up at the sheer cliffs of Pointe Du Hoc, knowing that Rangers conquered them with only ropes and courage is awe inspiring. The American cemetery at Omaha beach is humbling in a way that few other places can be. It is a beautiful monument to free men who risked everything for the liberty of strangers. It is holy ground.

normandy

There is a possibly spurious quote that is attributed to Colin Powell. I don’t care if he actually said it, or if it is verbatim, it is still true.

“Over the years, the United States has sent many of its fine young men and women into great peril to fight for freedom beyond our borders. The only amount of land we have ever asked for in return is enough to bury those that did not return.”

The D-Day anniversary stands in stark contrast to another anniversary that took place earlier this week, the Tiananmen Square atrocities. In one case, the might of a nation committed itself to freedom; in the other, tyranny.

I ask again, what are you doing with your freedoms?

Reality Check

Posted in freedom with tags , , , , , on June 4, 2013 by blackshepherd

Today marks 24 years since the Chinese government conducted a bloody repression of pro-democracy protestors in Tiananmen Square. Officially the Chinese government considered (and still considers) the protest a “counter-revolutionary revolt,” and justified the atrocities that followed as necessary for the maintenance of social order. Today in China even the most oblique internet searches related to the event are censored by the “People’s Republic.”

89-63_tank_man_-_web

Today in America we still have our freedoms, only because one generation after another has paid for them with money, time, sweat, tears, and blood. Sometimes with their lives. Most Americans have not earned their freedoms, they were given them as a gift the day they were born. A gift from those that have gone before. You were given freedom. What are you doing with it?